Smokey's Security Weblog

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Surf Smokey’s with confidence: all external links in posts are checked and rated by WOT – Web of Trust

Being a serious security board, we take our members web safety very seriously. This is why we have integrated the WOT (Web of Trust) feature on our board Smokey’s Security Forums.
All members will now be able to view the safety of any link provided on our site and will be able to see the trustworthiness, vendor reliability, privacy, and child safety of any site before clicking the link. More about WOT below.

WOT- Web of Trust

WOT warns you about risky websites. It will keep you safe from online scams, identity theft, spyware, spam, viruses and unreliable shopping sites. WOT warns you before you interact with a risky website. This is the reason that all external links in posts on Smokey’s Security Forums are from now on checked by WOT and therefore guarantee safe surfing via our board.

WOT is also available as free Internet security addon for your browser. We advice you to download and install this useful addon. It is an free, extra layer of defense against risky websites.

WOT is available as addon for Firefox and Internet Explorer.

System requirements

– WOT Firefox addon:

Operating system: Windows (all), Mac OS X, or Linux
Browser: Mozilla Firefox 1.5 or newer (3.0 recommended)

– WOT Internet Explorer addon:

Operating system: Windows 2000 / XP / Vista (XP or Vista recommended)
Browser: Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 or newer (8.0 recommended)

More info about WOT- Web of Trust and addon download: http://www.mywot.com/

Happy surfing, 🙂

Smokey

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August 8, 2009 Posted by | Advisories, Anti-Spyware, Anti-Virus, Bundleware, Downloads, Malware, Phishing, Recommended External Security Related Links | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Consumers Warned to Avoid Fake E-mails Tied to Bank Mergers

Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Alert concerning Bank Phishing

Online scammers are taking advantage of tough economic times. While e-mails phishing for sensitive data are nothing new, scammers are taking advantage of upheavals in the financial marketplace to confuse consumers into parting with valuable personal information.

The Federal Trade Commission urges caution regarding e-mails that look as if they come from a financial institution that recently acquired a consumer’s bank, savings and loan, or mortgage. In fact, these messages may be from “phishers” looking to use personal information – account numbers, passwords, Social Security numbers – to run up bills or commit other crimes in a consumer’s name.

Consumers are warned not to take the bait. The FTC has advice about how to stay on guard against this type of scam. To learn more, see the consumer alert “Bank Failures, Mergers and Takeovers: A ‘Phish-erman’s Special,’” at http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/alerts/alt089.shtm.

The FTC works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint or to get free information on consumer issues, visit http://www.ftc.gov or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.

Tips to help you avoid getting hooked by a phishing scam

– Don’t reply to an email or pop-up message that asks for personal or financial information, and don’t click on links in the message – even if it appears to be from your bank. Don’t cut and paste a link from the message into your Web browser, either. Phishers can make links look like they go one place, but actually redirect you to another.

– Some scammers call with a recorded message, or send an email that appears to be from an institution, and ask you to call a phone number to update your account. Because they use Voice over Internet Protocol technology, the area code you call does not reflect where the scammers are. To reach an institution you do business with, call the number on your financial statements.

– Use anti-virus and anti-spyware software, as well as a firewall, and update them regularly.

– Don’t email personal or financial information. Email is not a secure way to send sensitive information.

– Review your financial account statements as soon as you receive them to check for unauthorized charges.

– Be cautious about opening any attachment or downloading any files from emails you receive, regardless of who sent them. These files can contain viruses or other software that can weaken your computer’s security.

– Forward phishing emails to spam@uce.gov – and to the institution or company impersonated in the phishing email. You also may report phishing email to reportphishing@antiphishing.org. The Anti-Phishing Working Group, a consortium of ISPs, security vendors, financial institutions and law enforcement agencies, uses these reports to fight phishing.

– If you’ve been scammed, visit the Federal Trade Commission’s Identity Theft website at ftc.gov/idtheft for important information on next steps to take.

Source and tips: FTC.gov

October 12, 2008 Posted by | Advisories, Alerts, Malware, News, Recommended External Security Related Links, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment